Monks are generally credited with bringing black pudding into England and it was popular across the country from the middle ages. In later years, much of its popularity was to be found in the north of the country, most notably Bury in Lancashire but also across the Penines in Yorkshire. Dudley in the Black Country is also regarded as a hotbed of black pudding making. Most English black puddings are characterised by the inclusion of oatmeal, onions and herbs, notably pennyroyal, and it is this that separates it from European versions, particularly the far creamier French variety. It was for many years consigned to being part of a traditional fry-up but it is at last being seen as worth far more than that.

Monks are generally credited with bringing black pudding into England and it was popular across the country from the middle ages. In later years, much of its popularity was to be found in the north of the country, most notably Bury in Lancashire but also across the Penines in Yorkshire. Dudley in the Black Country is also regarded as a hotbed of black pudding making. Most English black puddings are characterised by the inclusion of oatmeal, onions and herbs, notably pennyroyal, and it is this that separates it from European versions, particularly the far creamier French variety. It was for many years consigned to being part of a traditional fry-up but it is at last being seen as worth far more than that.